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Cybersecurity Analyst Roadmap: How to become a Cybersecurity Analyst

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Cyber Security Analysts are professionals responsible for identifying, assessing, and mitigating security threats and vulnerabilities in computer networks and systems. They use a variety of tools and techniques to monitor and analyze system activity and investigate security incidents to help prevent future attacks. Cyber Security Analysts play a critical role in protecting organizations’ digital assets, ensuring compliance with regulations and standards, and mitigating risks.

Cybersecurity Roadmap

This comprehensive guide provides a step-by-step plan for individuals who aspire to become cybersecurity analyst. It outlines the key skills, tools, and techniques required to succeed in this field and offers practical advice on how to acquire them. Whether you're just starting or looking to advance your career as a cybersecurity analyst, this roadmap will provide valuable insights and direction to help you achieve your goals.

Entry-Level Cybersecurity Analyst Skills:

  1. Knowledge of computer networking concepts, such as TCP/IP, DNS,DHCP, network topologies and protocols.
  2. Familiarity with popular operating systems, such as Windows, Linux, and macOS, and their security features.
  3. Familiarity with programming languages such as Python, Java, and C++ to understand and analyze security tools and techniques.
  4. Ability to analyze and interpret security data using tools such as Wireshark and Snort.
  5. Understanding of common security threats and vulnerabilities, such as phishing, malware, and denial-of-service attacks, and the ability to analyze and interpret security data to identify potential threats.
  6. Familiarity with security tools and techniques such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems (IDS), and antivirus software to mitigate security risks.

Mid-Career Cybersecurity Analyst Skills:

  1. In-depth knowledge of networking protocols (BGP, OSPF, and MPLS) and technologies such as VPN, SSH, and SSL/TLS, as well as network segmentation and access control.
  2. Experience with vulnerability assessments (such as Nessus and OpenVAS.), penetration testing, and incident response to identify and mitigate security risks.
  3. Knowledge of security frameworks and regulations such as NIST, ISO 27001, and GDPR, and their application to organizational security strategies.
  4. Experience with security tools and technologies such as Security Information and Event Management (SIEM), IDS/IPS, and endpoint protection to detect and respond to security incidents.
  5. Strong analytical and problem-solving skills to investigate security incidents and recommend mitigation measures.
  6. Strong communication and leadership skills to lead security teams and collaborate with other departments to implement effective security measures.

Senior Cybersecurity Analyst Skills:

  1. Deep knowledge of cybersecurity principles, best practices, and emerging trends, and their impact on organizational security strategies.
  2. Experience managing security teams and projects, developing and implementing security policies and procedures, and managing compliance with regulatory requirements.
  3. Expertise in threat intelligence and risk management to identify and prioritize security risks and implement mitigation measures.
  4. Familiarity with compliance and regulatory requirements such as HIPAA, PCI-DSS, and SOX, and their application to organizational security strategies.
  5. Strong strategic planning and decision-making skills to develop long-term security strategies and prioritize security investments based on risk assessments and business needs.

Remember: These skills are a good starting point but employers may prioritize more skills depending on their specific needs.


Networking Protocols:

In computer networking, protocols are rules or standards that govern the communication between network devices. These protocols enable devices to communicate with each other effectively and efficiently. There are various types of network protocols, each designed for a specific purpose.

  1. TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol)
  2. HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol)
  3. FTP (File Transfer Protocol)
  4. SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)
  5. DNS (Domain Name System)
  6. DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)
  7. SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol)

A set of rules and standards used to communicate between devices on a network. These protocols enable data transfer between devices and allow devices to recognize and communicate with each other. As a Cyber Security Analyst, understanding networking protocols is crucial for analyzing network traffic, detecting potential security threats, and implementing security measures to protect against them. Explore essential resources to support your CySA+ certification journey and strengthen your expertise in cybersecurity.

As an entry-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have following skills:

  • Basic Knowledge of the OSI model and how it relates to network protocols.
  • Understanding of common network protocols such as TCP/IP, DNS, HTTP, and SMTP.
  • Familiarity with network scanning tools such as Nmap and Netcat.
  • Ability to identify network attacks such as DoS and DDoS attacks and how to mitigate them.
  • Basic knowledge of routing and switching concepts.
  • Ability to analyze network traffic using tools such as Wireshark and Tcpdump.

Kickstart your career in network security with Free Wireshark Certification Courses.

  • OSI Model: The OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) model is a conceptual framework used to describe how data is transmitted between different networked systems. The model is divided into seven layers, with each layer responsible for a specific aspect of network communication. The layers are:
      1. Physical layer
      2. Data link layer
      3. Network layer
      4. Transport layer
      5. Session layer
      6. Presentation layer
      7. Application layer
  • Routers: A router is a network device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers operate at Layer 3 of the OSI model and use routing tables to determine the best path for forwarding data.
  • Switches: A switch is a network device that connects devices together on a local area network (LAN). Switches operate at Layer 2 of the OSI model and use MAC addresses to forward data packets.

Certifications:

  • CompTIA Network+: This certification covers the basics of networking protocols, network architecture, and network security.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA): This certification provides a more in-depth understanding of networking protocols and technologies, including routing and switching.
Networking Protocols Courses for Entry-Level Cybersecurity Analyst:

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have following skills:

  • In-depth knowledge of common network protocols such as TCP/IP, DNS, HTTP, and SMTP.
  • Understanding of network protocols beyond the OSI model, such as MPLS and BGP.
  • Experience with configuring and troubleshooting network devices such as routers and switches.
  • Familiarity with network security controls such as firewalls and intrusion prevention systems (IPS).
  • Ability to analyze network traffic using advanced tools such as Splunk or ELK stack.

Network Architecture: Network architecture refers to the design and layout of a computer network. It includes the physical and logical components of the network, such as hardware, software, protocols, and communication channels, and how they are organized and interconnected. There are different types of network architectures, including:

  1. Client-Server Architecture: In this architecture, a central server manages resources and provides services to multiple clients.
  2. Peer-to-Peer Architecture: In this architecture, all nodes in the network are equal and can function both as clients and servers.
  3. Hybrid Architecture: This is a combination of both client-server and peer-to-peer architecture.
  4. Cloud Architecture: In this architecture, resources, and services are provided over the internet from a remote location, often using virtualization technology.
  5. Distributed Architecture: In this architecture, resources, and services are distributed across multiple nodes in the network.
  6. Mesh Architecture: This is a decentralized architecture in which every node in the network is connected to every other node.
  7. Hierarchical Architecture: In this architecture, the network is divided into multiple levels, with each level having a different level of control and responsibility.

Certifications:

  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP): This certification provides a more advanced understanding of networking protocols and technologies, including routing protocols, VPNs, and QoS.
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH): This certification covers the tools and techniques used for network scanning and enumeration, and can help identify vulnerabilities in network protocols.
Networking Protocols Courses for Mid-Career Cybersecurity Analyst:

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Cisco – TCP/IP & OSI Network Architecture ModelsUdemy1.5 Hours
2.Fundamentals of Networking EngineeringUdemy13 Hours
3.Wireshark for Basic Network Security AnalysisCoursera Project Network02 Hours
4.The Future of Network Security and DefenceCoventry University10 Hours


Network Topologies:

The physical or logical layout of a computer network, including the devices and connections that make up the network. Different types of network topologies, such as bus, ring, star, mesh, and tree, can affect network performance, security, and management. As a Cyber Security Analyst, understanding network topologies is essential for identifying potential security risks, implementing secure network configurations, and troubleshooting network issues.

As an entry-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Knowledge of common network topologies such as star, bus, ring, and mesh.
  • Understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different network topologies.
  • Familiarity with network architecture and design principles.
  • Basic knowledge of network cabling and wiring.
  • Ability to troubleshoot basic network connectivity issues.

Certifications:

  • Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT): This certification provides an entry-level understanding of networking concepts and technologies, including network topologies and cabling.

Linux:

Linux is a free and open-source operating system based on the Unix operating system. It is widely used in the cybersecurity industry because of its robust security features, stability, and flexibility. A Cyber Security Analyst needs to have in-depth knowledge of Linux operating systems to secure them against various threats.

As an entry-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Basic understanding of Linux operating system fundamentals, such as file systems, processes, and permissions.
  • Knowledge of Linux command line interface and basic commands.
  • Familiarity with common Linux distributions, such as Ubuntu, CentOS, and Red Hat.
  • Understanding of Linux security features and tools, such as SELinux and iptables.
  • Knowledge of basic shell scripting.

Certification:

  • CompTIA Linux+: This certification covers the Linux operating system fundamentals, command line interface, and security.
  • Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA): This certification validates skills in Linux system administration, including basic security and shell scripting.
Entry-Level Cybersecurity Analyst Linux Courses:

Languages:

Python:

A high-level programming language used for a wide range of applications, including scripting, web development, data analysis, and cybersecurity. In cybersecurity, Python is often used for scripting, automation, and data analysis.

  • Basic understanding of Python programming language syntax and concepts.
  • Familiarity with common Python libraries used in cybersecurity, such as Scapy, PyCrypto, and Requests.
  • Knowledge of how to write basic Python scripts to automate security tasks.
  • Understanding of how to use Python for data analysis and visualization in cybersecurity.
  • Knowledge of how to use Python for web application security testing.

Certifications:

  • Certified Python Developer (PCAP): This certification validates skills in Python programming language syntax and concepts, as well as basic problem-solving skills.
  • GIAC Python Coder (GPYC): This certification covers Python programming language fundamentals and how to use Python in cybersecurity.

C++:

In cybersecurity, C++ is often used for developing security tools and applications, such as antivirus software and intrusion detection systems.

  • Basic understanding of C++ programming language syntax and concepts.
  • Familiarity with common C++ libraries used in cybersecurity, such as OpenSSL and Crypto++.
  • Knowledge of how to write basic C++ programs to automate security tasks.
  • Understanding of how to use C++ for low-level systems programming and reverse engineering.
  • Knowledge of how to use C++ for exploit development.

Certifications:

  • Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP): This certification covers secure coding practices in C++, as well as other programming languages.
  • GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA): This certification includes a focus on using C++ for reverse engineering and exploit development.

Java:

In cybersecurity, Java is often used for developing security applications and tools, such as firewalls and access control systems.

  • Basic understanding of Java programming language syntax and concepts.
  • Familiarity with common Java libraries used in cybersecurity, such as Apache Commons and Java Cryptography Architecture (JCA).
  • Knowledge of how to write basic Java programs to automate security tasks.
  • Understanding of how to use Java for web application security testing.
  • Knowledge of how to use Java for secure network programming.

Certifications:

  • Oracle Certified Professional, Java SE 11 Developer: This certification covers Java programming language syntax and concepts, as well as object-oriented programming principles.
  • GIAC Secure Software Programmer-Java (GSSP-JAVA): This certification focuses on secure coding practices in Java, as well as common vulnerabilities and how to prevent them.

Data Security:

Data security refers to the process of protecting sensitive information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, or destruction. Cyber Security Analysts are responsible for identifying and implementing appropriate data security measures, such as encryption, access control, and backup and recovery systems, to safeguard sensitive data.

At entry-level, a cybersecurity analyst should have the following skills:

  • Understanding of Data Security: An Entry-Level Cyber Security Analyst must have an understanding of data security principles and practices such as encryption, access control, and data backup.
  • Familiarity with Data Security Tools: They should be familiar with the data security tools such as encryption tools, data loss prevention tools, and access control tools.
  • Basic Database Management Skills: They should have a basic understanding of database management and how to secure databases from unauthorized access.
  • Knowledge of Data Privacy Laws: Entry-Level Cyber Security Analysts should be aware of data privacy laws such as GDPR, CCPA, HIPAA, and other data protection regulations.
  • Understanding of Data Breaches: They should have an understanding of how data breaches occur and how to prevent them.
  • Knowledge of Cloud Security: Entry-Level Cyber Security Analysts should have a basic understanding of cloud security and how to secure data in the cloud.

Certifications:

  • CompTIA Security+ certification.
  • GIAC Information Security Fundamentals (GISF).
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional Certification (CISSP): Associate level.
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC).

Security Threats and Vulnerabilities:

Security threats and vulnerabilities are weaknesses or flaws in an organization’s security posture that can be exploited by attackers to compromise systems, steal data, or cause damage. Cyber Security Analysts must be knowledgeable about various types of threats and vulnerabilities, such as malware, phishing, social engineering, and denial-of-service attacks, and be able to identify and mitigate them.

As an entry-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Basic understanding of security threats and vulnerabilities, such as malware, social engineering, phishing, and ransomware.
  • Familiarity with common types of cyber attacks and how to prevent them.
  • Understanding of security concepts such as confidentiality, integrity, and availability.
  • Knowledge of common vulnerabilities in software, systems, and networks.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • In-depth understanding of advanced security threats and vulnerabilities such as zero-day exploits, advanced persistent threats (APTs), and insider threats.
  • Knowledge of advanced attack techniques such as social engineering, phishing, and spear-phishing.
  • Familiarity with threat intelligence sources and techniques for gathering and analyzing threat data.
  • Experience with vulnerability assessments and penetration testing to identify and mitigate security vulnerabilities.
  • Knowledge of threat modeling and risk analysis methodologies.

Certifications:

  • CompTIA Security+ certification
  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
  • GIAC Certified Incident Handler (GCIH)
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
  • GIAC Penetration Tester (GPEN)

Malware: Short for malicious software, it is a type of software designed to damage, disrupt, or gain unauthorized access to a computer system. Common types of malware include viruses, worms, trojans, spyware, and adware.


Attacks:

  1. DoS Attack:

A Denial-of-Service (DoS) attack is a type of cyber attack that is designed to disrupt or temporarily disable the normal operations of a targeted system, network, or website. In a DoS attack, the attacker floods the targeted system with an overwhelming amount of traffic or requests, which can cause the system to slow down, become unresponsive, or even crash.

The goal of a DoS attack is to disrupt the availability of a targeted system, which can cause financial losses, reputational damage, or even pose a threat to public safety, in the case of critical systems such as those used in healthcare or transportation. Defending against DoS attacks requires implementing proper security measures such as firewalls, intrusion prevention systems, and traffic filtering.

  1. Zero-day exploits:

A type of cyber attack that takes advantage of a previously unknown vulnerability in software or hardware before it can be fixed or patched by the vendor. Zero-day exploits can be very effective for hackers because the target is not aware of the vulnerability and has not taken any steps to mitigate the risk. If you’re looking to fortify your defenses against online intruders, our Protecting Against Hackers: A Course Review provides crucial insights.

  1. Advanced persistent threats (APTs):

A type of attack that is typically carried out by sophisticated, well-funded cybercriminals or nation-states. APTs are designed to be stealthy and persistent, often using a combination of social engineering, malware, and other techniques to gain access to a target’s network and remain undetected for long periods of time.

  1. Phishing:

A type of social engineering attack that involves sending fraudulent emails, text messages, or other electronic communications that appear to come from a legitimate source. The goal is to trick the recipient into providing sensitive information or clicking on a link that installs malware on their computer.

  1. Spear-phishing:

A more targeted and personalized form of phishing attack that is directed at a specific individual or group. Spear-phishing emails are often tailored to the recipient’s interests, job function, or other personal information in order to increase the likelihood of success.

  1. SQL Injection:

A type of cyber attack where an attacker injects malicious SQL code into a web form input or database query in order to access or modify sensitive information stored in the database. SQL injection attacks can lead to data breaches, unauthorized access to confidential information, and system compromise.

  1. Cross-Site Scripting (XSS):

A type of cyber attack where an attacker injects malicious code into a website or web application that is then executed by unsuspecting users. This can result in the attacker stealing sensitive information, such as login credentials, or performing unauthorized actions on the user’s behalf.

  1. Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF):

A type of cyber attack where an attacker tricks a user into unwittingly sending an HTTP request that performs an unauthorized action on a website or web application. This can result in the attacker changing a user’s password, making unauthorized purchases, or performing other actions on the user’s behalf.

  1. Social engineering:

A type of attack that uses psychological manipulation to trick individuals into divulging sensitive information that may be harmful to their organization or themselves. Common examples of social engineering include phishing scams, pretexting, and baiting.

  1. Ransomware:

A type of malware that encrypts files or locks down a victim’s computer and demands a ransom payment in exchange for restoring access to the data. Ransomware attacks often use encryption algorithms and can cause significant damage to individuals/businesses.


Security Tools and Techniques:

Security tools and techniques refer to various software and hardware solutions used to prevent, detect, and respond to security threats. A Cyber Security Analyst must be familiar with a wide range of security tools and techniques, such as firewalls, intrusion detection and prevention systems, antivirus software, penetration testing, and incident response.

Here are some skills that an entry-level cybersecurity analyst should have:

  • Familiarity with security tools such as firewalls, antivirus software, and intrusion detection/prevention systems.
  • Knowledge of secure network design and configuration.
  • Understanding of security monitoring and event management.
  • Ability to conduct vulnerability assessments and penetration testing.

Here are some skills that an mid-career cybersecurity analyst should have:

  • Experience with advanced security tools such as SIEM, EDR, and DLP solutions.
  • In-depth knowledge of network protocols and traffic analysis techniques.
  • Familiarity with security testing methodologies such as OWASP and OSSTMM.
  • Understanding of security automation and scripting.

Certifications:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP).
  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM).
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT).
  • Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP).
  • GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC).

Ready to boost your cybersecurity knowledge? Dive into our collection of resources and unlock your CISM skills for free.


Analytical and Problem-Solving:

Analytical and problem-solving skills refer to the ability to analyze complex information, identify patterns, and solve problems effectively. A Cyber Security Analyst must be able to analyze security data, identify potential security risks, and recommend appropriate solutions to mitigate them.

Here are some skills that a mid-career cybersecurity analyst should have:

  • Strong analytical skills to be able to analyze and interpret security data.
  • Strong problem-solving skills to be able to identify and resolve security issues.
  • Familiarity with tools and techniques used in security analysis, such as threat modeling, risk assessments, and incident response.
  • Ability to use critical thinking to identify patterns and trends in security data.
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team.

Certifications:

  • SANS Cyber Security Essentials Certificate: This certificate is designed for those who are new to cybersecurity and covers the basics of cybersecurity. It is a good option for those who are just starting out in the field and want to develop their problem-solving and analytical skills.

Network Segmentation:

Network segmentation refers to the process of dividing a network into smaller subnetworks, called segments, to improve security and performance. A Cyber Security Analyst must have a deep understanding of network segmentation principles and techniques to design and implement secure network architectures.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • In-depth understanding of network segmentation principles and techniques.
  • Knowledge of segmentation approaches such as VLANs, DMZs, and micro-segmentation.
  • Experience with implementing network segmentation in complex network environments.
  • Knowledge of tools and technologies used for network segmentation, such as firewalls, routers, and switches.
  • Familiarity with best practices for network segmentation, including risk assessments and policy development.

Certifications:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP): This certification covers a wide range of security topics, including network segmentation. It validates the knowledge and skills required to design, implement, and manage effective security program.
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Security: This certification covers the fundamentals of network security, including access control and network segmentation. It validates the knowledge and skills required to secure network infrastructure and devices.

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Subnetting Made EasyUdemy01 Hour


Access Control:

Access control refers to the process of limiting access to resources, such as systems, applications, and data, based on a user’s identity and permissions. A Cyber Security Analyst must be knowledgeable about various access control methods, such as role-based access control and attribute-based access control, and be able to implement and manage them effectively.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • In-depth knowledge of access control principles and techniques, including role-based access control (RBAC) and attribute-based access control (ABAC).
  • Experience with designing and implementing access control policies and procedures.
  • Knowledge of access control technologies, such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and identity and access management (IAM) systems.
  • Familiarity with compliance and regulatory requirements related to access control, such as HIPAA and PCI DSS.

Certifications:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP): This certification covers a wide range of security topics, including access control. It validates the knowledge and skills required to design, implement, and manage an effective security program.
  • Certified Authorization Professional (CAP): This certification focuses specifically on access control and validates the knowledge and skills required to assess and authorize information systems based on regulatory and organizational requirements.

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Access Control ConceptsISC04 Hours
2.Penetration Testing, Incident Response and ForensicsIBM15 Hours


Vulnerabilities Assessments:

Vulnerability assessments refer to the process of identifying and evaluating security vulnerabilities in an organization’s systems and applications. A Cyber Security Analyst must be proficient in vulnerability assessment tools and techniques, such as vulnerability scanners and penetration testing, and be able to identify and prioritize vulnerabilities for remediation.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Strong understanding of vulnerability scanning and management tools like Nessus, Qualys, and OpenVAS.
  • Familiarity with web application security vulnerabilities like Cross-Site Scripting (XSS), SQL Injection, and Cross-Site Request Forgery (CSRF).
  • Knowledge of vulnerability assessment methodologies like OWASP (Open Web Application Security Project).
  • Ability to analyze and interpret vulnerability scan results and provide recommendations for remediation.

Certifications:

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) by EC-Council.
  • GIAC Certified Vulnerability Assessor (GCVA) by SANS Institute.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) by ISC2.

Vulnerability Assessment Methodologies: A process of identifying and evaluating vulnerabilities in a system or application. Common methodologies include network vulnerability assessments, web application vulnerability assessments, and penetration testing.

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Network Security & Database VulnerabilitiesIBM14 Hours


Penetration Testing:

Penetration testing refers to the process of simulating a real-world attack on an organization’s systems and applications to identify security weaknesses and assess the effectiveness of existing security controls. A Cyber Security Analyst must be skilled in conducting and managing penetration testing activities, including planning, executing, and reporting.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Strong knowledge of penetration testing tools and techniques like Metasploit, Nmap, and Burp Suite.
  • Familiarity with the OWASP Top 10 vulnerabilities and how to exploit them.
  • Experience with social engineering techniques to gain unauthorized access.
  • Knowledge of post-exploitation techniques to maintain access to systems.
  • Ability to write detailed penetration testing reports and provide recommendations for remediation.

Certifications:

  • Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP) by Offensive Security.
  • Certified Penetration Testing Engineer (CPTE) by Mile2.
  • GIAC Penetration Tester (GPEN) by SANS Institute.

Incident Response:

Incident response refers to the process of responding to and managing security incidents, such as data breaches, malware infections, and system compromises. A Cyber Security Analyst must be able to develop and implement incident response plans, conduct forensic investigations, and communicate effectively with stakeholders during and after an incident.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Strong understanding of incident response frameworks like NIST and SANS.
  • Familiarity with incident response tools like SIEM (Security Information and Event Management), EDR (Endpoint Detection and Response), and forensics tools like EnCase and FTK.
  • Ability to analyze and interpret security event data to identify potential incidents.
  • Experience with incident response planning and tabletop exercises.
  • Knowledge of regulatory requirements related to incident response like GDPR and HIPAA.

Certificates:

  • Certified Incident Handler (GCIH) by SANS Institute.
  • Certified Computer Examiner (CCE) by ISFCE.
  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) by ISC2.

Communication:

The ability to effectively convey information and ideas to others through various communication channels, such as verbal, written, and visual. In cybersecurity, communication skills are essential for collaborating with other team members, communicating technical information to non-technical stakeholders, and presenting findings to senior management.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills.
  • Ability to explain technical concepts to non-technical stakeholders.
  • Strong presentation skills.
  • Ability to write clear and concise reports.

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Effective Communication: Writing, Design, and Presentation SpecializationUniversity of Colorado80 Hours


Leadership Skills:

The ability to inspire and motivate a team to achieve its goals and objectives. In cybersecurity, leadership skills are essential for managing and leading a team of cybersecurity professionals, developing and implementing security strategies, and ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements.

As a mid-career cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Ability to manage and mentor a team of cybersecurity professionals.
  • Strong project management skills.
  • Ability to develop and implement cybersecurity policies and procedures.
  • Experience with budgeting and resource allocation.
  • Ability to manage vendor relationships.

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Strategic Leadership and Management SpecializationUniversity of Illinois96 Hours
2.Leadership: Practical Leadership SkillsUdemy03 Hours


Security Policies and Procedures:

Security policies and procedures refer to a set of rules, guidelines, and best practices that an organization follows to ensure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of its systems and data. A Cyber Security Analyst must have a deep understanding of security policies and procedures and be able to develop and enforce them effectively.

As a senior-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Expertise in developing and implementing security policies, standards, and guidelines.
  • In-depth knowledge of compliance requirements and regulations, such as HIPAA, PCI-DSS, and GDPR.
  • Understanding of security frameworks, such as NIST Cybersecurity Framework and ISO 27001.
  • Familiarity with audit and compliance tools and methodologies.
  • Excellent communication and collaboration skills to work with various teams and stakeholders.

Security Frameworks: A structured approach to managing and improving an organization’s security posture. Common security frameworks include the NIST Cybersecurity Framework, ISO/IEC 27001, and CIS Controls.

Security Policies: A set of guidelines and procedures that dictate how an organization’s information technology resources should be used and protected. Security policies typically cover areas such as access control, data classification and handling, incident response, and risk management.

Certifications:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)
  • ISO 27001 Lead Implementer/Lead Auditor

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Master in Cyber Security Law and PolicyUdemy01 Hour


Risk Management:

Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing, and mitigating security risks in an organization’s systems and applications. A Cybersecurity Analyst must be able to perform risk assessments, develop risk mitigation strategies, and communicate risk.

As a senior-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Expertise in identifying and assessing security risks and vulnerabilities.
  • Experience in developing risk management strategies and plans.
  • Understanding of various risk management frameworks and methodologies, such as FAIR and OCTAVE.
  • Ability to conduct risk assessments and prioritize risks based on potential impact and likelihood.
  • Familiarity with risk management tools and technologies.

Risk Management Frameworks and Methodologies: A structured approach to identifying, assessing, and mitigating risks to an organization’s information technology resources. Common risk management frameworks include the NIST Risk Management Framework and ISO/IEC 31000.

Certifications:

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)
  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)
  • Certified Risk Management Professional (CRMP)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)

#Course NameProviderDuration
1.Risk Management SpecializationNY Institute of Finance48 Hours
2.Modeling Risk and RealitiesUniversity of Pennsylvania07 Hours


Compliance and Regulatory Requirements:

As a senior-level cybersecurity analyst, you should have the following skills:

  • Deep knowledge of relevant regulations and standards: A senior-level analyst should have a thorough understanding of various regulatory frameworks and standards such as NIST, HIPAA, PCI DSS, and ISO 27001.
  • Experience with compliance assessments and audits: A senior-level analyst should have experience in conducting compliance assessments and audits to ensure that organizational policies and procedures are in line with regulatory requirements.
  • Ability to develop and implement security policies and procedures: A senior-level analyst should be able to develop and implement security policies and procedures that align with regulatory requirements and effectively manage risks.

Certifications:

  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC): This certification from ISACA validates expertise in IT risk management and compliance.